Quiet morning at lake Henriksvatnet. THe Visttindan peaks behind. Photo Carl Norberg.

There are a number trails on the outskirts of the national park. However, as you enter the high mountains only a few routes are partially marked with cairns – otherwise you must use map and compass find your own way in the terrain. There are some cabins and simple shelters, but for extensive hikes you are well-advised to bring a tent.

Lomsdal-Visten is wild and varied. The area has numerous rare and distinctive natural features, from coastal biotopes to inland valleys and alpine peaks. Rivers with beautiful waterfalls enliven the area. A unique quality of Lomsdal-Visten, in a European as well as a Norwegian context, is that this large unspoiled region also includes pristine coastal areas.

Morning haze in Innervisten. Photo Carl Norberg.

Elgvidda, the Strompdalen valley and old forest in Skjørlægda. Photos Carl Norberg.

Why a national park?

The area, which gained status as a national park in 2009, covers ​​1102 km2. The park’s objective is to:

  • preserve a large, distinctive and almost untouched natural area
  • preserve its biodiversity, geology and cultural heritage relics
  • ensure the region’s diversity of natural habitats, including its large boreal rain forest
  • preserve the area’s caves and distinctive karst topography
  • preserve a varied Helgeland coastal landscape that extends from the fjords all the way to the high mountains

The national park area invites people to pursue the traditional rewards of simple outdoor life. Preservation of its natural resources is vital also to the livelihood and culture of the local indigenous Sámi people; the area is particularly important for traditional reindeer husbandry.

Why a national park?

The area, which gained status as a national park in 2009, covers ​​1102 km2. The park’s objective is to:

  • preserve a large, distinctive and almost untouched natural area
  • preserve its biodiversity, geology and cultural heritage relics
  • ensure the region’s diversity of natural habitats, including its large boreal rain forest
  • preserve the area’s caves and distinctive karst topography
  • preserve a varied Helgeland coastal landscape that extends from the fjords all the way to the high mountains

The national park area invites people to pursue the traditional rewards of simple outdoor life. Preservation of its natural resources is vital also to the livelihood and culture of the local indigenous Sámi people; the area is particularly important for traditional reindeer husbandry.

What is permitted?

Outdoor activities, including hunting and fishing, can be enjoyed within the national park as well as in the surrounding area. Visitors are allowed to pick wild berries and mushrooms. You may use dead wood found on the ground for firewood and to grill sausages and prepare other food, but old dead and dying trees must be left untouched, as these are vital to insects and woodpeckers.

Undue noise is prohibited in the national park. You are not allowed to use drones, motorised model planes, or power ice augers. Singing loudly is perfectly fine – provided you are not being a nuisance to the wildlife or other human visitors of the park!

Anything you bring, you must take with you when you depart. No trash whatsoever may be left behind in the national park.

If you are planning to fish or hunt, you must carry a valid fishing or hunting license. Ensure that you have made any agreements needed with private landowners.

You’re allowed to collect dry sticks for making fire, but leave the old pines and spruces. Photo Carl Norberg.